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 Posted: Tue Nov 21st, 2006 11:44 pm
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Maria
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Tiffany's world comes home
Winter Park-based treasures shine at major New York exhibit
Michael Mcleod | Special to the Sentinel
Posted November 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- It would grieve Louis Comfort Tiffany to discover that his cherished Long Island mansion disappeared long ago.

But he would be elated to see its luminous reincarnation, as arranged by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Today the Met, in partnership with the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park, opens a six-month exhibition devoted to Laurelton Hall, the enchanted, 600-acre enclave that was both a home and a life's work. Tiffany designed it, then filled it with creations of his own and collections from afar, representing his lifelong quest for beauty.

On Monday, representatives from the Morse previewed "Louis Comfort Tiffany and Laurelton Hall -- An Artist's Country Estate." The exhibit's 250-plus objects and architectural remnants include 27 of the lush, innovative leaded-glass windows that brought Tiffany international acclaim. It represents the first full-blown effort since an abandoned Laurelton Hall burned nearly to the ground in 1957 to explore what it represented to Tiffany, and recapture its bygone elegance.

"What you can see here for the first time is how Tiffany worked with scale," said Morse director Larry Ruggiero. "He was equally comfortable working with large spaces and with the most delicate things."

Ruggiero and the small party of Morse staffers felt a bit like visitors to a home that had been decorated with their own furniture. About half of the Met exhibit consists of loans from the Morse Museum.

By combining the Met's extensive Tiffany collection with that of the Morse, and by bringing in other priceless Tiffany artifacts from museums and private collections, curator Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen has created a startling tribute -- startling because Tiffany is revered but pigeonholed. He is associated almost exclusively with glass when in fact his range of materials was much broader.

This is Tiffany in three dimensions -- an exhibit that shows how he worked as an artist and designer with interiors to make visitors feel as if they had just walked into one of his stained-glass creations.

"The sheer beauty of Tiffany is overwhelming," said Frelinghuysen. "There were many times, as we were working on the exhibit, that I would look up and see someone on the staff just staring."

The dining-room display illustrates how Tiffany carefully coordinated color. Six stained-glass transoms depict wisteria in bloom. A massive, blue leaded-glass ceiling echoes the pattern in the rug beneath the dining-room table and the upholstery of the dining-room chairs. An oil painting of ducks reflects the same color combination.

The majority of the windows and architectural fragments in the exhibit are from the treasure trove salvaged from the ruins of Laurelton Hall by Hugh and Jeannette Genius McKean, the Winter Park couple who founded the Morse Museum. Hugh, who died in 1995, had visited Laurelton Hall to study under Tiffany as a promising young painter in 1930.

An audio guide that accompanies the exhibit features Hugh McKean's tape-recorded voice, extolling the grandeur of the mansion's Fountain Court, which featured a multicolored fountain and a pipe organ, and where Tiffany often entertained his guests:

"With the pipe organ going full blast and the fountains changing color and the bear rugs on the floor and the fountain water stream running through the house, it was to see Louis Tiffany under the most favorable circumstances," McKean rhapsodizes. "He was living out beauty and he was handing it on to other young people. That was his great dream."

The Fountain Court is one of several areas of Laurelton Hall that are evoked in the exhibit, which begins with an enlarged photo of Laurelton Hall flanked by two Qing Dynasty lions from Tiffany's substantial collection of Asian art.

The lions lead the way to a series of galleries suggesting early Tiffany residences and possessions, including an ornately inlaid piano, on loan to the Met from one of Tiffany's descendents.

A gallery is devoted to Tiffany's collections, which included oriental thrones and armor. Another depicts the "forest room" or living hall, which Tiffany designed to have a sense of a refuge in deep woods, with heavy, green-glass lighting fixtures hung from an iron yoke, and stained-glass windows depicting scenes from nature. The most conspicuous of these windows are the Four Seasons, a luminous and ingeniously wrought depiction of spring, summer, winter and fall that brought him international attention when it was displayed at a Paris exhibition in 1900.

The largest part of the exhibit is the Daffodil Terrace, which was just outside the dining room in Laurelton Hall. The terrace consists of eight 11-foot-tall Italian-marble columns, topped with wreaths of opalescent glass daffodils, and a coffered ceiling of iridescent glass panels and stenciled tiles.

"I think people will walk into this exhibit and say, 'Wow. He did all this?' " said Jennifer Thalheimer, collections manager for the Morse.

Her fascination with Laurelton Hall dates to her childhood, when she grew up near the still-elegant ruins of the mansion.

Years later, Thalheimer is one of the full-time caretakers of what remains of Tiffany's treasures. She spent hour after hour engaged in the painstaking, meticulous process of packing the Morse's priceless collection to send off to the Met. Then she flew to New York to spend two weeks unpacking it. She will be involved in a reversal of that process when it all heads back to Winter Park in six months.

"It's a lot of work," she said. "But it's home."



 Posted: Tue Nov 28th, 2006 01:27 am
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Roberto
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Here's a link to an article about Willet Hauser Studio:

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2006/11/22/stainedglass/



 Posted: Wed Dec 27th, 2006 06:29 pm
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Maria
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Nice article about Nikki Vogt.
 
Click here: NewsAdvance.com | Lynchburg native designed windows in New York churches
 
http://www.newsadvance.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=LNA/MGArticle/LNA_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149192328936&path=



 Posted: Thu Jan 18th, 2007 08:14 pm
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Maria
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Shared with permission of Commonweal magazine. This article was written by Sylvia Nicolas' sister, Claire.

And Then There Was Light
Five Generations of Stained-glass Makers

Claire Nicolas White

The absurd is the object of faith and the only object that can be believed.
  Kierkegaard
The art of stained-glass painting has been practiced by my family for five generations. Toward the end of the nineteenth century, the neogothic style introduced by the French architect Violet le Duc became the accepted one for church building and decoration. St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York is one example.
At that time, my great-grandfather, François Nicolas, was the first family member to establish a stained-glass studio in the Catholic south of Holland, and he became well known for his idealized figures of saints, in a somewhat pre-Raphaelite style. His son continued the business and briefly visited the United States, where several commissions were executed by the Nicolas firm. When my father, Joep Nicolas (1897-1972), came along, he was thoroughly bored by the static, conventional work of his predecessors and won first prize with a daringly modern window at the 1925 Art Deco exhibition in Paris. From then on he became a rather revolutionary figure in the art of stained glass. He tried some early abstraction, but found that his true vocation was storytelling: illustrating the Bible and the lives of the saints.
My father’s work was the focus of our lives, both in Holland before the Second World War and later in New York. Every afternoon he took a nap. It was his finest hour. “It’s when I have my best visions,” he explained to friends. When my sister and I were children in Holland, he had a double door made to his bedroom so that we would not wake him. But we were young and played hopscotch and skipped rope, singing local songs in the garden below his window. Then he would erupt, looking like an irate scarecrow in his undershirt, his hair standing on end.
“I told you to keep quiet. You ruined my nap. I don’t count in this house.” And he’d retreat, slamming both doors, then reemerge properly dressed in his striped turtleneck sweater and wearing a little skullcap, rather like a Jewish yarmulke, and go off to his studio across the garden. The cap was to keep him from going bald from the powdered paint he used for staining his windows. His pate eventually grew bare anyway, so that his curly black hair stood out only on the sides of his head, spreading like the rays from Moses’s forehead, as we had seen him paint them repeatedly.
Father deserved his nap. Rising before any of us, he sometimes worked until three in the morning, standing in front of his huge drawing board on a rolling ladder. His brush flew over the paper, drawing the intricate Catholic iconography with sepia ink. “Ecclesiastical funny papers,” he called it.
The studio in the garden had once been a chapel. Its large gothic windows were his light easel. The glass was cut there, heated in ovens, and leaded. It had been his father’s and grandfather’s studio. But his were not the elegant saints and angels his ancestors had painted. Father’s figures grimaced and gesticulated, like the people in the street of this town in southern Holland, this region of atavistic Burgundian humor and festivities, excessive carnivals and Catholic theocracy. Color was one of the strongest elements in his windows, dictated not so much by realism as by what he called the music, the rhythmic quality of the general effect, so that faces could be green, a profile bright red, while the lead grid provided an asymmetrical counterpoint.
Everything in our household was steeped in religious tradition: the food we ate, the legends we were told, the songs the maid sang to us. Everything seemed to have another, added meaning, an imaginary one.
On the night of the Three Kings
A ship sailed into the harbor
In which Mary Magdalen sat
They played the triangular organ
They poured Mary the wine
They pulled the nails from Christ’s hands
And sang Mary the song
Your sins shall be forgiven
No matter how much you did wrong.
The harbor is specific, Antwerp probably. I can see it. My grandmother taught me the song. That strange shipload has become part of me, but I would not claim it to be history.
We live in an increasingly mobile, restless world. Almost every one of us is an immigrant of sorts. And yet, no matter how distant the homeland has become, I still cling to a memory of origin, of a local mentality that has printed its character on me. My father’s homeland, which was also mine in my childhood, remains with me, as does the source of his creative imagination, which he realized was provincial, idiosyncratic. When courting my mother, who was already well traveled and spoke several languages, he wrote to her, “It’s up to you whether you will be satisfied with a man who lives for imaginary things.” She had complained that his paintings were all on religious subjects. He answered her, “For the moment, I am not yet detached from the symbols which fed my imagination, obsessing my whole youth.” How common this is: Marc Chagall, all his life painting pictures of a dreamlike shtetl life; André Aciman writing constantly about leaving Egypt; Igor Stravinsky weaving Russian folk songs into much of his music.
If imagination is the creative power that perceives the basic resemblances between things, then all sources, no matter how exotic, resonate in me as well. Imagination is fed by metaphor. Religion and the Scriptures, if perceived as such, are not a fundamentalist prison but an open field for visionary inspiration.
And so we return to my father’s naps. “I have always considered myself lucky to have come from a region that produced Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, and Jan Van Eyck,” he used to say. Indeed, a more extravagant imagination than Bosch’s is hard to find. Hell and the devil, of course, are a rich source for the grotesque, whereas heaven is open to the most divine idealizations. “Life,” said Father, “is an odd house. In the basement lives the erotic. On the ground floor resides the tragic. On the second floor lives the grotesque, and in the attic the mystical.”
When he came to New York during World War II, Father became uprooted, joining an international crowd of refugee artists, many of them surrealists: Salvador Dalí, Pavel Tchelitchev, Max Ernst. That the subconscious is a fertile field for the imagination is obvious, and it served him well. The horrors of war now became an obsessive subject. He covered the walls of our apartment with grimacing soldiers in rags whose bestial feet trampled naked women. The eagle of Poland flying across the dining room croaked quid quid quid est veritas? The titles of his paintings were often suggestively literary, such as Nostalgia for Chaos, Flight, and The End of Illusions.
He did well in this country. A headline in the New York Telegram announced, “War Brings the World’s First Stained Glass Painter to America.” Father’s windows for the Presbyterian church in Fairmount, Ohio, were reproduced in color in Life magazine. He was commissioned to produce what he called square miles of stained glass by the Rambusch firm in New York: large windows in Mooseheart, Illinois, and for the Trappist monastery in Spencer, Massachusetts. But he came to regard his religious work as largely commercial, as if, severed from his roots, it no longer seemed valid. The local priest preached about football games, the hymns were sentimental.
Then, in the 1950s, he returned to his homeland, where he had the most rewarding commissions of his lifetime, in both Catholic and Protestant churches. Religion was not a dull convention for him, a retelling of tales told a thousand times. For him, every time the Scripture was read it was as if for the first time. “Religion is a reality and no false nostalgia.... Fake primitivism has nothing to do with actual emotions,” he wrote.
One of the last works he undertook was a series of eight large windows on the Apocalypse. He considered this the greatest challenge of his career. Every night he went to bed with the Book of Revelation and was haunted by visions in his dreams. He was aware of other masterpieces he had to contend with: the French tapestries of Angers, Albrecht Dürer’s woodcuts. In the end, his rendition of the most far-out visionary text, traditionally thought to have been written on the island of Patmos by St. John, perhaps high on drugs or driven mad by the starkness of the desert, became my father’s greatest imaginary masterpiece.
But when faced by a young Catholic convert who pounded on the table with his fists, insisting that there must be “an absolute truth,” my father’s face twitched with discomfort. “The truth,” he said, “is like a beautiful bird with bright colored feathers that flies into one window of the room, crosses it, and by the time it reaches the opposite window, it stinks.”
When Pilate asks, “What is truth?” Jesus does not answer. Is it God making the world in six days? Why not read it as a metaphor? Have American fundamentalists lost the art of reading the Bible as poetry, insisting on some literal reality that makes no sense? It is a book rich with images that every artist interprets according to his own imagination, a faculty over which no absolutism applies.
My sister, Sylvia Nicolas, described in the November 2005 U.S. Catholic as one of the leading ecclesiastical artists in the United States, has been extremely active in our father’s field in this country. She recently executed all the windows in the Sts. Philip and James Church in St. James, New York, and for new churches at Providence College, in Rhode Island, and on the Queens campus of St. John’s University in New York. Now her son Diego has established a studio in Holland and has just completed a large window in the cathedral of Roermond, our father’s hometown. For five generations, our family has practiced the art of storytelling, of reimagining the events told in the Bible, making them once more come to life.
 
________________________________
Stephen Aubrey
Editorial Assistant
Commonweal Foundation
475 Riverside Drive Room 405
New York, NY 10115
212-662-4200
http://www.commonwealmagazine.org
________________________________
 



 Posted: Wed Feb 14th, 2007 09:46 pm
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Maria
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"People are like stained-glass windows.  They sparkle and shine when the
sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed
only if there is a light from within."

-- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross --



 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2007 04:07 am
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Maria wrote: "People are like stained-glass windows.  They sparkle and shine when the
sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed
only if there is a light from within."

-- Elizabeth Kubler-Ross --


People are like stained glass windows.  They sag when they get old.

People are like stained glass windows. They get brittle and fall apart.

 

--Vic Rothman--



 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2007 02:16 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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You're quite the poet Vic!



 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2007 02:38 pm
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mmezalick
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So at what age do people get "restored"



 Posted: Thu Feb 15th, 2007 11:13 pm
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Vic
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better call a consultant



 Posted: Fri Feb 16th, 2007 10:33 am
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mmezalick
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So, maybe those involved with fixing stained glass windows could be called doctors . Maybe ? You know making "house" visits and writing out prescriptions. But , will the " nurses" still have to wear white?



 Posted: Mon Mar 5th, 2007 03:25 pm
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Maria
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Tiffany wasn't alone; 5 windows produced by Manhattan's Decorative Stained Glass can be found in West Brighton
Sunday, March 04, 2007
By MICHAEL J. FRESSOLA
STATEN ISLAND ADVANCE

With the Tiffany Studios so close, right on 25th Street in Manhattan, it was easy for Staten Island buyers to acquire leaded-glass windows and other treasures -- provided they had the money.

Tiffany wasn't the only glass racket in town, however. Artist/designer John La Farge operated a popular studio, Decorative Stained Glass in Greenwich Village, where he and a friend, David Maitland Armstrong, developed a new, layered opalescent glass that miraculously gave the illusion of depth.

In 1914, Maitland Armstrong produced five windows for the Randall Memorial Church, a much-scaled-down homage to St. Paul's in London, at Sailor's Snug Harbor. In those days, the Harbor complex, which is now a park and cultural center, was a retirement home and hospital.

By the 1950s, the Harbor's trustees had allowed the church to fall into dangerous disrepair and the city decided to demolish it. Fortunately, before the wrecking ball swung, a new home was found for the irreplaceable windows. They survive today in Calvary Presbyterian Church, West Brighton.

All five depict New Testament figures that are exceptionally lifelike. They were the work of painter Helen Maitland Armstrong, a daughter of the boss. Another daughter became a celebrated designer of book bindings.

Typically, as was the case with Clara Driscoll, women in the glass studios worked without credit, although they were much appreciated for their ability to cut glass deftly. Again, Ms. Maitland Armstrong seems to have been an exception.

Maitland Armstrong wasn't fond of having a lot of painting on his windows. He preferred to let the leaded-glass sections do all the work of defining the image. Apparently, he was too content to let his daughter delineate the heads, hands, feet and intricate details.

After 50 years, the windows need refurbishment. An ongoing rehabilitation, at a cost of as much as $100,000 per window, is proceeding as funds become available.

Two windows, "Supper at Emmaus" and "Calling of Peter and Andrew," have undergone repair and reinstallation. Three remain.

To assist the effort or take a self-guided tour, call church curator Jim Logan at 718-981-5657.

Tiffany windows are more numerous than Maitland Armstrongs. Locally, there are five Tiffany windows in the 102-year-old Christ Episcopal Church in New Brighton. There also is one in a private home on Vine Street in St. George.

Three others were lost years ago when fire swept the old Brighton Heights Reformed Church, also in St. George.



 Posted: Mon Mar 5th, 2007 03:32 pm
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Maria
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This is a printer friendly version of an article from http://www.southbendtribune.com

Article published Mar 4, 2007
Kokomo Opalescent Glass is at 1310 S. Market St., on the southwest side of Kokomo, IN

Tours are free and offered at 10 a.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. The factory has no climate control. Casual clothing is recommended for the walking tours; no open-toed shoes are allowed.

For more information: (765) 457-1829 or http://www.kog.com

Playing with color Firm fires up glass, creates iridescent beauty

JANE AMMESON
Tribune Correspondent

KOKOMO -- Before he began making his own glass for his famous windows and lamps, Louis Comfort Tiffany ordered it from Kokomo Opalescent Glass.

Invoices show that Tiffany wasn't always timely about paying his bills, but that didn't seem to affect the firm, which opened in 1888 and claims to be the oldest continuously operating manufacturer of opalescent and cathedral stained glass in the world. The company, still owned by members of the three founding families, is set up to manufacture more than 22,000 different combinations of glass in varying textures, colors and density.

The factory invites visitors to take a tour. In the vast room where an amalgam of materials -- soda ash, silica sand, crushed limestone, feldspar colors and minerals -- is melted to form various glasses, fires burn constantly. Clay pots holding about 1,200 pounds of material cook overnight at a temperature of 2,400 degrees Fahrenheit.

After the material has melted, workers reach into a 12-sided clay oven and scoop out molten glass from each of the dozen pots inside.The scoops, which vary in size, with the largest holding 65 pounds, are rotated by workers as they move from the oven to a rolling machine.

On its way to the table where it is mixed to form colors, the molten glass looks like glowing orange dough.

"Today, they're doing a three-color glass combination," says Anne Elliott, marketing director of KOG. "Some days it's five, some days one, depending upon the orders."

KOG's amazing varieties of glass differ in color, texture and density. They are produced by processes and formulas that have varied little over time.

Elliott's husband, Dick, is president of the factory and a fourth-generation owner. He reflects on how in 1998, KOG was able to supply glass for a rose window restoration at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis by following the recipe the company used to make the glass for the church's original construction in 1896."We do a lot of restoration work," says Anne Elliott, noting that the company has formulas for all the glass the factory has made in the last 119 years.

But besides helping match old colors and patterns, KOG creates glass for modern artists. The Botti Studio of Architecture Art, whose Web site description says it is the "creator of the world's largest exterior mosaic mural and other extreme exterior art projects," buys glass from KOG, as do artists who turn the glass into lampshades, tables and windows.

KOG was started by three businessmen who were part of a large group of entrepreneurs enticed by the city to come to Kokomo in the mid-1800s after a large pocket of natural gas was discovered nearby. The city promised free gas to anyone who opened a business in the area and created jobs. It seemed an easy enough promise to keep. It was expected the gas would last forever; unfortunately, forever was only 10 years. Of all the businesses that took advantage of the city's offer, KOG is the only one still operating.

The company became renowned for its opalescent glass, swirls of many colors melded together with a milky white cast. It was so popular at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1889 that business boomed.

But there was a dark side to the company, which makes for romantic reading now. A detailed history of KOG, written by Paul Crist and posted on the company's Web site, tells the story of Paris-born Charles Henry who came to Kokomo two years after the gas boom and founded the company. While the company flourished, Henry's mental health declined. Both delusional and manic, he went on a global spending spree that pushed the company into the red. His partners bought him out for $1 on Jan. 29, 1890, and three days later, Henry married one partner's considerably younger daughter. Within three months, the factory went into receivership and Henry, after bouncing a check written in the amount of $50,000, ended up in the Indianapolis Insane Asylum.The business has been considerably calmer in the 116 years since then.

KOG added a Hot Glass Studio, a stop on the tour, about 10 years ago.

Its purpose, Anne Elliott says, is to produce a distinctive range of quality hand-blown and hand-cast opalescent glass. Visitors can watch the studio glass artists -- including Jon Wolfe and Michael Amis, both independent artists who have exhibited their work internationally -- create one-of-a kind and limited-edition functional and sculptural hand-blown glass objects such as Christmas ornaments, paperweights, serving bowls, glasses, vases and pitchers. The studio also makes custom-ordered glassware. Creations include Colorfields with soft blends of light and dark fields, and Rondels, featuring bright bands of color.

Another tour stop is a room where sheets of glass in a rainbow array of colors, textures and patterns are stored for packing.

The tour ends, as so many do, at a gift shop. The factory's Op Shop offers various glass objects, including ornaments, lamps, vases and drinking glasses, many of them made on the premises.



 Posted: Thu Mar 15th, 2007 07:41 pm
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Issue no. 5 of Vidimus is out now: go to http://www.vidimus.org and click on ‘Current Issue’

This edition brings a feature on the G. King & Son, Lead Glaziers of Norwich, a family firm that became a by-word for quality in stained glass restoration, conservation and the understanding of the medium. There is news of an important acquisition at the Getty, and a Panel of the Month from the glorious east window of King’s College Chapel, Cambridge.



 Posted: Tue Apr 10th, 2007 02:14 am
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http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSL083973920070408

Dutch cathedral unveils 9/11 attack in stained glass

Be sure to click on the two small thumbnails to the left of the article to see photos of the entire window.

Another article on the same subject, but goes into more detail:
http://www.gulfnews.com/world/The_Netherlands/10117172.html

Last edited on Tue Apr 10th, 2007 02:16 am by Maria



 Posted: Tue Apr 10th, 2007 10:48 am
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We also recently, October 2006,  installed a window dedicated to the memory of the 9-11 tragedy.

The window was designed by Fr. Richard Canulli OSA, director of the Villanova Art Gallery. Fabricated by the VETRATE ARTISTICHE TOSCANE studio in Siena, Italy.

The window was installed on the campus of Villanova University which is just adjacent to Philadelphia, PA. The window panels were stone set and exterior laminated glass, vented, was also installed.

The overall size of the window is 50” x 120”.

A small note to point out. The flight numbers of the four planes that went down that day are added in the four tracery openings of the window design.

The names of the alumni from Villanova who died that day are listed at the bottom right.

Michael Mezalick

Attached Image (viewed 455 times):

Madonna%2011%20set.jpg



 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2007 09:29 pm
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Krueger
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Michael, I am wondering why the Villanova window was fabricated in Italy?  Thanks.  Is it signed?

Barbara in Michigan



 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2007 09:50 pm
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Barbara,

It was the decision of the designer who has worked with the Italian studio for over 25 years on several rather large projects. We have done several of the installation for them.

It may be as simple as the designer likes to travel to Italy to view the progress now and again.

It is signed by both the designer, who lives in Villanova, PA  and the studio in Italy.

As history will show, the installers are never known.

Michael



 Posted: Thu Apr 12th, 2007 01:59 am
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http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/story.html?id=3794540d-40eb-4046-b568-92c89834c536

Excerpt: More than five decades ago a stained glass window made by a renowned Renaissance artist -- a triptych depicting the biblical Adam and Eve creation story -- was purchased by a B.C. chocolate magnate and installed in his Fort Langley castle.
But the Garden of Eden window, made in 1533 by French artist Valentin Bousch, may soon be leaving the province and possibly Canada.
The window, which centuries earlier was installed in a Benedictine Abbey at Flavigny-sur-Moselle in France, is scheduled to be auctioned next week by Maynards Auctions.



 Posted: Fri Apr 13th, 2007 02:02 am
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Adam
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Interesting article about a church in Pittsburgh

.http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07086/772748-42.stm



 Posted: Mon Apr 16th, 2007 03:27 pm
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Maria
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http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/heraldnews/entertainment/340714,4_5_JO15_STAINED_S1.article

Exhibit honors Lockport artist

Historian David V. Wendell of Bolingbrook will deliver the keynote address in opening ceremonies for the dedication of a new exhibit honoring internationally renowned Lockport stained glass artist John J. Kinsella.

The exhibition, titled "Cathedrals of Color: The Stained Glass of John J. Kinsella Studios," will open to the public during a special sneak preview at 7 p.m Thursday April 19, 2007, in Community Hall of the DesPlaines Valley Public Library, 121 East 8th St., Lockport.

The stained glass of local artist John J. Kinsella, such as the one above, will be on exhibit beginning Thursday at the Des Plaines library.

Kinsella was raised on a farm between Lockport and Joliet, and at the age of 21, established his own studios in Chicago's Little Italy neighborhood. He helped to pioneer the "Favrile" style of glass invented by John LaFarge and L.C. Tiffany and his works, considered equal to the great masters' landmarks, decorate many Chicago and southwest suburbs' cathedrals.

More than 200 images depicting stories of the Old and New Testaments are seen in the photographic essay that chronicles Kinsella Studios' most outstanding and award winning glass canvasses. Among these are The Memorial Window at St. Dennis Catholic Church in Lockport, God's Promise at St. John Berchmanns in Logan Square, and the world famous Lancet Windows of St. James Chapel in Chicago.

The St. James windows alone required six years to be installed and are composed of fifteen individual lancets that stand nine feet wide by forty feet tall. The early 20th century hand painted masterpieces replicate those at St. Chappelle, the Reliquary in Paris which holds the crown of thorns worn by Jesus at the cross.

Wendell has spent more than a year researching Kinsella and his studio's legacy. After discovering the firm's prolific artwork was largely forgotten, he began photographing both the imposing, and the more intimate, details that characterized the company's inimitable craftsmanship.

"Cathedrals of Color" will remain on display through Memorial Day weekend. The lecture and admission to the exhibit is free.

For information, call (815) 838-0755.



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