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Cold glass artist Jon Kuhn
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 Posted: Sat May 30th, 2009 03:57 pm
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Maria
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Here's an article that caught my eye.  I have posted many articles related to stained glass which I've come across on the web.   I share them without endorsement.   Each reader can judge on his own.  I welcome comments and discussions related to any posted article.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/stainedglasswindows/JonKuhn/prweb2469554.htm



 Posted: Sun May 31st, 2009 01:09 pm
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Don Burt
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 Can't fault them for trying to generate some excitement.  I personally think that the hyperbole can be self-defeating when it crosses a certain line.  I love the concept of cold-worked elements in window panels. Dennis Swan's work seems like it has potential for larger scale pieces.

 



 Posted: Sun May 31st, 2009 05:13 pm
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Adam
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I thought of Dennis as well when I was reading this. They act like this is the first guy to ever bevel glass. I went to Delphi a year ago and they had a room full of people epoxying layers of glass together and then beveling them in a class. Some of the layers had inclusions of Dichroic and different colored glass. The work looks really nice and is quite stunning, but you have to have a church that can blow 20,000 dollars on a cross thats only 30" tall. Most of the churches I know of would have a hard time justifying that expense for a little Bling. I think they have a better idea of going after the Residential and Commercial market.



 Posted: Sun May 31st, 2009 05:19 pm
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Adam
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I also find it amusing that he wants his work to last hundreds of years. My thought was, don't put it in a church window. I've seen cold worked epoxy jobs done in the seventies, falling apart within the last 5 years or so. I'm sure the epoxy companies told the artists in the seventies that this would be a really great epoxy that would last a hundred years or more. But has long as they're comfortable with that possibility and are willing to stand by they're work for the long run, good luck to them.



 Posted: Mon Jun 1st, 2009 01:57 pm
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CZL
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In 1961 I designed an epoxy stick up job for a church in Nebraska ,
for the Rambusch studio in NYC. It was different from most
of the windows they doing at the time and I don't know if
they ever did any thing else like it after I left there in 62.
I never found out how long it lasted either.
A young man from Long Island installed it I think his
name was Phil Macanna. He ended up with a skin rash
from it. Not that much was known about the effects of
epoxy then. My point is that kind stuff has been going on
for a while, so I am not so sure how revolutionary
it is now, it sure as hell did not start a revolution then.
Rambusch hired Phil because he had been using epoxy
to stick his race car back together and he lived next door
to Harold Rambusch, Phil became our factory trained expert. I guess
he got over the rash I sure hope so. Up the Revolution. CZ



 Posted: Tue Jun 2nd, 2009 01:38 pm
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iaff84
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What this brings to my mind is how far the different types of glass areas have been separated. Hot, warm, cold, flat, dimensional, and such. Each area seems to want to keep its own space and look down on any other discipline in glass.

The work presented in this article and displayed on web site http://www.kuhnstudio.com/ are second to none. Could not get a good feel for the his work put into leaded  glass, but feel it must be some intricate eye candy. (my words) Appears to be some intricate work to create each blank and then the work of grinding and polishing.

Now all of a sudden, hold on, a revolution for leaded glass!? Must say I do not see it. As a grinder, I am limited to "finds" as far as the glass blank I start with, seems they create their own, excellent idea.

The "revolution" (not my words) I would like to see would be the boundaries setup by all the different glass groups gone and all come back together. Incorporate pieces parts, make some glass or at least have some dialog, can only spark more glass and hopefully some good glass.

There are several leaded glass folks out there incorporating many found as well as "made" pieces into their work. I would hope this article helps open more minds to some possibilities.

My main thought on using ground and polished glass in a leaded glass pane; less is always more.

I'll leave a grinder on for ya,

Dennis Swan



 Posted: Fri Jun 5th, 2009 01:50 pm
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Krueger
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Just returned from the Corpus Vitrearum conference in NYC.  http://www.corpusvitrearum.org/  Although most of the presentations were about aspects of medieval glass problems and subsequent conservation, there was one about faceted/dalle glass and the sustainability of cement....and epoxy.  Considerable research being done in Europe which relates specifically to sustainability of epoxy.  There were many questions and comments  which continued at lunch....about concrete degredation, leaks in epoxy windows, use of exterior glazing to prevent water getting to concrete, poor anealing of dalles, etc.  The next Corpus conference will be in Lisbon in 2011 and rather than having medieval glass at the fore, glass installations from 1920 to the current time will be the topic.  Check the Corpus web site this fall for a Call for Papers.

Barbara Krueger, Michigan



 Posted: Sat Jun 6th, 2009 07:05 pm
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Courage
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Dalle de Verre failure is happening down south. I have a page on my web site showing significant Dalle failure. I feel that the failure is due to multiple reasons such as poor annealing, the inability of the epoxy resin to flex, and our extreme heat with moisture.

Attached Image (viewed 1128 times):

IMG_0216.JPG



 Posted: Sat Jun 6th, 2009 10:10 pm
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Ardbeg
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That's just gruesome !

Can you explain in more detail whhat's being seen in the image ? Is the ghostly white phlem just deteriorated epoxy, or is other stuff happening too ? Is the glass affected at all ?

Yuech.



 Posted: Sat Jun 6th, 2009 11:07 pm
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Adam
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To me that looks like the glass is internally fracturing into thin shards and possibly devitrifying at the same time? Am I right? Have you ever tried to remove this glass from the surrounding epoxy? Did it fall apart in thin shards like a piece of flint would? You could try to cut the glass out with a fein knife or one of those mini handheld circular saws for cutting glass or mirrors.



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 02:59 am
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Courage
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If you get a minute, go to my web site, http://www.attenhofers.com, under albums, I have a study of Dalle de Verre failure, with 47 pics of a local church. I don't have the solutions to their problems. I think it is a combination of some colors that might not have annealed properly, the heat outside, a non flexible epoxy resin, and what Mr. Stephen Koobs from the Corning museum describes as glass sickness. This glass continues to fracture itself and then creates a hole in the matrix. Mold and pollutants get sucked into the fractures, and haze the glass. I have seen this type of failure at few of the churches in the New Orleans area, but this one is the worst. Most of the installations are not that old.

Attached Image (viewed 943 times):

IMG_0229.JPG



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 03:02 am
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Courage
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The glass could easily be removed, but the problem is extensive at this site. I don't have any real solutions for this type of failure.



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 04:40 am
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G'day Cindy,

Based on things I have observed with dalles de verre windows in Oz, I would hazard a guess that the epoxy matrix is far too strong for the glass which is crushing itself due to there being no absobant relief for thermal expansion.

The windows that I have had to deal with have cracked throughout their epoxy matrix but not the glass. The cracks emanate from the corners of the glass dalles and spread out from there indicating that the epoxy is incapable of flexing with the expanding glass. In my cases though, the glass was stronger than the epoxy.

When I get back to my work computer I will post a photo.

Cheers

Geoff



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 10:22 am
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mmezalick
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Geoff,

I would think the extreme heat and moisture is the deciding factor. I have seen this type of window bend under their own weight and with enough heat to soften the epoxy, but not having the damage to this extent.


I have also worked on windows that fell apart due to lack of adhesion of the epoxy.


Anyway, it looks like a new door of "restoration" is opening.

I can't wait to see what guidelines are issued from the experts.

Best regards,

Michael

 

 



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 04:36 pm
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iaff84
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I have reread the post about this revolution. I take it to read that he developed an epoxy for putting his glass blanks together, they are cold worked then these leaded into panels, not for dalle windows as spoke to here. Also that his epoxy Cross and such are free standing type work, not exposed to the elements. Have I missed something?

Dennis



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 06:53 pm
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Krueger
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Dennis, I think the point of our discussion is also about epoxy....and its apparent degredation when exposed to UV and heat/cold/weather elements over a long period of time. 

Barbara in Michigan



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 09:05 pm
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Vic
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Courage wrote: If you get a minute, go to my web site, http://www.attenhofers.com, under albums, I have a study of Dalle de Verre failure, with 47 pics of a local church. I don't have the solutions to their problems. I think it is a combination of some colors that might not have annealed properly, the heat outside, a non flexible epoxy resin, and what Mr. Stephen Koobs from the Corning museum describes as glass sickness. This glass continues to fracture itself and then creates a hole in the matrix. Mold and pollutants get sucked into the fractures, and haze the glass. I have seen this type of failure at few of the churches in the New Orleans area, but this one is the worst. Most of the installations are not that old.

Contact

 Laurence Cuzange





Site :
http://dgvitrail.fr/acrvfu.htm

She gave a paper at the CVMA conference in NYC last week concerning Dalle de Verre failure. Between your New Orleans Creole and her French you should communicate beautifully

Vic




 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 11:37 pm
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gwsg
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Here are some photos of cracks in the epoxy matrix that I believe are due to thermal expansion of the dalles.

Attached Image (viewed 891 times):

IMG_3777.jpg



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 11:56 pm
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Courage
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Vic, you make me giggle. I appreciate all of the posts, and I will continue to monitor a few sites. Right about now, I am wishing I knew French, and that I had taken more chemistry. Its ironic, tomorrow we have to install 8 Dalle de Verre door panels (five salvaged and three re-makes). These panels are post Katrina flooded New Orleans East, and were ready for their deadline of Christmas. This particular church has Dalle De Verre cracks throughout all of its windows. They have not started to self fracture, yet. I will keep an eye on this one too. So, Michael, plenty of restorations, we need that plan.



 Posted: Sun Jun 7th, 2009 11:57 pm
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Courage
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Thanks for the pic and I definitely agree. Also, I think the faceting of the glass may make the Dalle more vulnerable to fracturing, and and the elements.

Last edited on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 11:59 pm by Courage



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