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Production Lead Cutting
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 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 03:09 pm
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meliebowitz
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I am working on a job where I will need to cut hundreds of 1/4" leads to the same size, let's say 6". I am looking for favorite techniques, tools or suggestions from the forum. The cut will be at a right angle. Any thoughts?



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 04:34 pm
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BloodGlass
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I would just set a gauge on my saw, put on some music and cut away. I have had to cut hundreds of identical sized pieces at times out of all sorts of material and it's always the trusty saw with a gauge



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 05:20 pm
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meliebowitz
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2 questions: what type of saw are you using? And what music do you listen to?



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 08:30 pm
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BloodGlass
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Saw is not a purchased product, just self made but more or less it's a mini table saw type set up. Like a jewlers saw on steroids... Using a 6inch blade

The music is all dependent on the mood of the day but chances are it will always be some sort of Rock, anything from Tool to Pink Floyd... Although lately it's been Audio books, good long ones



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 09:11 pm
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Vic
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here is my home made lead saw, with sliding articulated/adjustable 6 foot arm

Attached Image (viewed 322 times):

saw4-1.jpg

Last edited on Tue Apr 1st, 2014 09:14 pm by Vic



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 09:12 pm
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Vic
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lead saw

Attached Image (viewed 313 times):

saw1.jpg



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 09:13 pm
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Vic
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lead saw

Attached Image (viewed 321 times):

saw6-1.jpg



 Posted: Tue Apr 1st, 2014 09:27 pm
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BloodGlass
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Nice set up! So we are on the same page, how many teeth are you working with on that saw?



 Posted: Wed Apr 2nd, 2014 10:00 am
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meliebowitz
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Vic, That's a beautiful machine. Do you rent it by the hour? Or- what type of blade is it? How many teeth?



 Posted: Wed Apr 2nd, 2014 06:04 pm
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BloodGlass
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From your picture I am assuming you are using some sort of jewlers slitting saw with like 300 teeth... I used such a blade for years. I accepted the fact that every few cuts of lead you need to clear, unclog, the blade in whatever manner you choose.
Then one wonderful day I decided I had enuff of clogged blades and I started using a blade that had FAR FEWER teeth and it was one of the best things I ever did! Now I am only speaking in terms of cutting lead, this does not apply to other materials so much. But for cutting lead of almost any kind at whatever angle fewer teeth is where it's at for me!



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2014 07:25 pm
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gil
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I find that most small saws, jewelers saws, Jarmac etc. are useless when you're really cutting a large number of pieces. Table saws are particularly useless since you usually have to jury rig some sort of jig for holding long pieces of lead that must be cut at an angle. The answer is to go to Lowes (Heaven forbid) or Home Depot and buy a Skil Compound Miter Saw for $120 (the brand is not very important, this one was the cheapest and relatively light) and a Freud non ferrous metal cutting blade for around $50. It will outlive you. Since it's a miter saw, you don't need some kind of unwieldy jig to cut angles, you just change cutting angle of the saw. You can set up a stop, bundle together as many cames as you can without exceeding the cutting capacity of the saw, tape them together with blue tape or whatever and cut away. Use a wax lubricant stick. It will keep cuts cleaner and probably extends the life of the blade. The cuts are just as clean as you would get from a jeweler's saw blade and you'll get home before your children grow up. It works especially well with massive custom lead cames. I would definitely not use this to cut half a dozen 3/16" cames. Hang on to that other little saw for jobs like that.
By way of disclosure, I must say that the basic idea for using a contractor's miter saw came from Patrick Baldoni of Femenella Associates.
PS Wear a full face shield!



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2014 11:14 pm
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Vic
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you are correct it is a jewelers slitting saw blade H.S.S 5" x.028" with a 1/2" arbor. 280 teeth. To prevent clogging I rigged up a plastic bottle with a copper tube , with a wick in it. The wick touches the side of the blade and lubes it with a little kerosene

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DSCN3914-001.JPG



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2014 11:19 am
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kathy
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Thanks for the pictures and tips.

Last edited on Fri Apr 4th, 2014 11:20 am by kathy



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2014 05:53 pm
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BloodGlass
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I say again Vic, nice set up! That is truly a masterful saw set up, I love what you have done with the wick set up, I use china pencils to lube the blade every once in a while and cut a piece of Zinc on occasion to clear the clogged blade... That is when using the 320 teeth blade, 280 teeth sounds like a great number I'm gonna try that out next time I get some blades. In my frustration with clogs I had blades custom made with only 42 teeth, 6X .032 HSS They work fantastic but are very aggressive so I don't really recommend using a blade like this for everyone.

Attached Image (viewed 252 times):

image.jpg



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2014 06:05 pm
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BloodGlass
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I understand what you mean about having to make a set up to accommodate a whole length of lead but I have that all built in to my set up so it hadn't crossed my mind. The saws that Vic and I are working with are similar to a Jarmac set up only in the way you use the blade, if I had a Jarmac or a small sized saw such as that I also would never recommend cutting hundreds of pieces with it.
What kind of blade would you use in the chop saw set up that you have spoken of??



 Posted: Sun Apr 6th, 2014 04:26 pm
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gil
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To be specific it's a Freud D1080N Diablo Non-Ferrous/ Plastics Blade, 10" diameter, 5/8" arbor, 80 teeth TCG. $59.97 from Woodcraft.com. They probably have it at Home Depot and Lowes. The reason I use this particular blade is that it also makes excellent cuts in aluminum, brass, and bronze. I can also put it on my table saw and cut sheets of Lexan or acrylic quite easily.
Also, having 80 teeth on a 10" diameter blade eliminates clogging, but as I said previously use a wax stick lubricant at at least every dozen or so cuts.



 Posted: Wed Apr 9th, 2014 12:11 pm
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meliebowitz
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Thank you to everyone who took the time to answer, post photos and explore the topic.



 Posted: Mon Dec 29th, 2014 12:48 am
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ArmandoRussell
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Bosch 5312 12-Inch Dual Bevel Slide Compound Miter Saw is the best miter saw known to me so far.... It is easily readable bevel and miter scales for easy setting of accurate bevel and miter angles..

For further queries and details , kindly visit the following website:
http://www.compoundmitersawreviewss.com/



 Posted: Mon Dec 29th, 2014 02:11 am
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ArmandoRussell
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Bosch GTS1031 10-Inch Portable Jobsite Table Saw is best and has optimized capacity for broad range of applications. This saw works very well , having plenty of power.. The fence is accurate and easy to use..


For further details and queries kindly visit the following website:
http://www.portabletablesawreviewss.com/



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