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Photoshop and Wacom Tablet
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 Posted: Tue Jan 15th, 2008 01:57 pm
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mmezalick
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Your doing wonderfully. The post came thru loud and clear.

You should see if anyone near you offers classes and give it a try.

You would be amazed how it helps. It does not replace but add to your arsenal of tools.

Michael



 Posted: Tue Jan 15th, 2008 04:11 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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I use a PC, though I know many people love their Macs.  The Wacom works with both.  My tablets are about 9"x12".  Th larger sizes are better for flowing lines and such, they're just large to carry around, which is why I have two.   (They're also great for playing Freecell.)  I already had Photoshop, so I didn't use the bundled software that came with the tablet. 

Pen and ink and paint will always look better as an object than a printed sketch - I don't think we'll be finding inkjet sketches on ebay, unlike watercolor or oil sketches - but the versatility of computers makes them compelling in their own way.  

Mary



 Posted: Tue Jan 15th, 2008 06:11 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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And no matter how you make the sketch, for us what really matters is the stained glass that follows it. 

Mary



 Posted: Mon Jan 21st, 2008 06:59 pm
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tkrepcio
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Though I've used Photoshop and Illustrator in the process of designing stained glass windows since 1992, I've never used drawing tablets. Too much of a disconnect. I never liked that you are physically drawing on one surface (the tablet) while the drawing appears on another surface (the screen) - and with older, slower computers there was always the delay in what you drew compared to when it appeared on the screen.
I'd rather just draw, then scan.

But apparently that has changed.

Has anyone is stained glass tried the Cintiq? It's the new big thing in drawing tablets. With the Cintiq, Wacom has attempted to simulate the look and feel of drawing on paper, where you draw on the same surface where the drawing appears. Apparently they even roughened up the surface of the glass to make it feel more like paper.

http://www.wacom.com/cintiq/index.cfm

It's been most quickly embraced by those artists where speed and volume are an issue, like cartoonists, comic book artists and animators.

But there is a price. Just a year or so ago at $3000US, it's come down to $1000-2500US. Still not yet in the realm of most stained glass studios.

This isn't a product plug, since I've never used one myself. In fact, I've never so much as seen anyone use a Cintiq, except on youtube.

Does anyone know of any stained glass window that has been designed on a Cintiq? or does anyone know of a stained glass studio that has one?

And, maybe a more important question, is it really necessary to have such a thing in the slower, more deliberate, process of stained glass design?

Just curious...



 Posted: Mon Jan 21st, 2008 08:27 pm
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mmezalick
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Tom,

I have a similar product. It is in a hand held binder that I use on site when taking measurements or layout drawings. I can download the information on to my computer and use the information as a word document. That information can be shared with my other programs as needed.

It makes for quick work when you need to transfer information from paper to computer.

There is also a program that will allow you to scam your image  or document into your computer and it is recognized as a word document and it can be edited as needed.

Michael



 Posted: Mon Jan 21st, 2008 08:43 pm
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mmezalick
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After a bit of thinking I remembered I saw a product at the AIA Show in LA a couple of years ago.

How about a 80" touch screen that you can use for drawing directly into your computer.

http://www.magictouch.com/42_touch.html

 

It a new word out there.

Michael



 Posted: Mon Jan 21st, 2008 11:07 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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Tom,

You do get used to looking at the screen while you draw on the tablet.  It all depends on how you like to design.  I saw something recently where an artist was describing how they worked and said that, for them, the most important thing was realizing what kind of environment they needed to create for themselves so they could actually get their work done.  For each of us that will be different and is why some of us will never use a computer and others always will, and then the many shades in between. 

Mary



 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2008 05:40 am
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Ardbeg
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I have to say I think my shade of grey is more like Tom's.

Although I use photoshop, digital cameras etc etc etc, and take a lot of computing stuff on site, if required, I still do my drawings and initial notes in my nice A4 drawing book - like a dairy / notebook / artist's drawing book. I now have lots of them, from years and years and years, yet I find them invaluable for taking notes, staple-ing in bits of paper related to the job, sticking in contact's calling cards etc etc, even taping in glass shards for later use. Paint samples, colour matching - some things, I think, just work best on paper.

I like my pencil, and my note book.

Technology has it's place, but not in THAT part of my head.

Maybe I'll change my mind in years to come, but, in good conservation parlance, "why change something that ain't broke?"

Linda the dinosaur



 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2008 09:18 pm
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glassgal
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HI - I am in the process of looking into buying a MAC laptop and also want to buy some Stained Glass software - any feedback would be welcome.



 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2008 09:22 pm
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glassgal
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Second comment - for those of you that have experience in computers and software - what would be on your Santa list if you would do it all over again ? I will take the Mac classes simce I am a IBM windows user.



 Posted: Fri Feb 8th, 2008 11:42 am
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Olimpia
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Hello,

This is my first post here and I can actually comment on the topic at hand. I have designed my stained glass panels for the last 15 years using Micrografx Designer, now it is called Corel Designer, not Draw, Corel bought Micrografx. It is a difficult program but once mastered it is a wonderful tool. I own Illustrator but I am so used to Designer I've had a hard time switching but I am trying since I think at the very least I should know how to use both. I really can't figure out how to use Photoshop for my designs other than scanning a photo of what I want and tracing it, more than likely manually, just can't get that magic trace, or live trace set right either.

I used to draw everything by hand on thick onion paper and used watercolors to resemble the glass. I would frame these with heavy black matting board. They did look wonderful but it was so hard when a customer suggested, "could you please eliminate this flower?" or "can we change that shade of green?" Now it's clicks away, change all you want!

I would really like to get a drawing tablet but I am certain I can't afford the better ones. Not even sure I could get used to using one. Maybe later...

I'll try to upload an example of what I've done with my software. It was not a finished drawing and it is of course based on an Alphonse Mucha print and it never came into completion, but it was a good exercise of color combination.

Attached Image (viewed 155 times):

Mucha Color web.jpg



 Posted: Fri Feb 8th, 2008 12:20 pm
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mmezalick
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Olimpia,
Thanks for joining in.

As you have read there are several ways of getting the results one is looking for. We all have our preferences.

And yes, isn't so much easier to make those little changes for the client now. I used to do a lot of cut and paste just to get the client what they wanted.

I think you would really like the tablet approach.

Too bad we can just rent one for a time.

Again, welcome.

Michael



 Posted: Fri Feb 8th, 2008 12:57 pm
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Olimpia
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Hi Michael,

Thank you so much for the welcome!

One of these days I'll buy the tablet, but renting it would be great, wouldn't it? This way I would know if I should just go ahead and buy the best since I know I'm going to love it!

 

Very interesting forum by the way. I will be reading a lot, I can tell.



 Posted: Sat Feb 9th, 2008 08:38 am
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bbates
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When learning a new program, I hit my local library first!  They often have a good selection of the most common programs like illustrator and photshop...

If your library does not carry what you are looking for, then ask to request a book.  I usually research books on Amazon.com, then request the good ones at the library.  Sometimes they come in via inter-library loan, or they may buy it depending on their budget I would assume.  My library bought a book for me that cost more than $100!  And I am almost certain that I was going to be about the only one using it...

Tablets are only about $100 and up.  And, stores like Best Buy, often have decent return policies.  I would buy it, try it, then return it if it's not what you though it would be.  Check the return policy first, of course.



 Posted: Wed Feb 13th, 2008 06:06 pm
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Hallie Monroe
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I know this is a month since replies, but may I add that I have taken a several classes with Ken Leap and watch how he works his magic with Glass Eye and he imports images from photo shop. He inspired me to get glass eye.
However my old mac could 'nt use it because it was only for PC's.
Took an investment leap of faith,and got the mac with a Duo processor and a pallet.
I am still learning, but I have already done a successful presentation combining photo's, and can also see how size changes will mean a lot less paper and erasers.
Being and old school "illustration major" I still keep a drawing book, and go to life drawing weekly.
This has just been another tool added to my vocabulary.



 Posted: Tue Feb 3rd, 2009 06:37 pm
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Don Burt
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I finally replaced my old Calcomp tablet with a new Wacom. It has really improved the egonomics of shading and color with Photoshop. The tablet has the improved pressure sensitivity which I expected, but what I'm really enjoying is the little hot keys in the corner that I can use my left hand to zoom, pan, and most wonderfully, vary the size of the brush or pen tip while not changing activity of the stylus in my right hand. I find designing much more enjoyable with the new tablet.

I'm going to the Buffalo conference this summer. Maybe we can reserve one of the conference's overhead projectors for a lunch time workshop on Photoshop, Illustrator and tablets? I could go through some basic operations that I enjoy, and then we could investigate questions, or just swap tips and techniques? Any interest? 

 



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