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Loss of value due to repair?
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 Posted: Thu Apr 20th, 2017 08:39 pm
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MikeD
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I have recently been drawn into a discussion in regards to whether or not repairing a stained glass window reduces its value. We recently repaired some hail damage where the pieces of stained glass were pulverized. The repair amounted to 3 small painted pieces (less than a total of 8 square inches) in a church window that is about 100 years old and is 6 feet wide and 24 ft tall. It is all painted glass and very ornate. At a viewing distance of 5 feet you cannot discern the repair. Some of the congregants are adamant that we reduced the value of the window by executing the repair. I have no idea of what their solution to the damage might have been.
I'd appreciate any feedback or opinions in regards to loss of value.
Thanks,
Mike



 Posted: Thu Apr 20th, 2017 10:05 pm
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Maria
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Mike,
Please post photographs of the window showing the original damaged area as well as photos of the replacement pieces. If you saved the "pulverized" pieces, post a photo of those as well. It will be easier for us to give you ourl opinions which may be helpful to you.
Maria



 Posted: Thu Apr 20th, 2017 11:00 pm
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MikeD
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Here are 3 photos (one in each message) of the damaged area. Each piece was inscribed (in the paint under the lead) as to when and by whom the replacements were done.

Attached Image (viewed 80 times):

2016-12-16 10.23.03 with oval.jpg



 Posted: Thu Apr 20th, 2017 11:03 pm
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MikeD
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Here are 3 photos (one in each message) of the damaged area. Each piece was inscribed (in the paint under the lead) as to when and by whom the replacements were done.

Attached Image (viewed 81 times):

2017-01-19 11.12.48 with oval.jpg



 Posted: Fri Apr 21st, 2017 03:30 pm
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Courage
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Dear Mike,

The finished photos are not of similar resolution to the original damaged picture therefore it is difficult to diagnose your repair work and voice an accurate opinion. Is there anyway you can post a better picture (higher resolution/clarity) of your finished product?

Best,
Cynthia



 Posted: Fri Apr 21st, 2017 05:48 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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This is really a question for an appraiser. If anything caused their window to lose value, it was the rock that went through it. As long as you did a competent job repairing it they are losing sight of the fact that you removed a gaping hole hole from the window.

Technically, from an appraisal standpoint, their window, because it was damaged, might be valued less, but that is not the 'fault' of any restorer who has done a competent job removing that hole.



 Posted: Fri Apr 21st, 2017 07:36 pm
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Vic
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Did you ask them if they want the broken glass, with holes<
put back in? LOL



 Posted: Fri Apr 21st, 2017 07:40 pm
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gil
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This is what happens when everyone, myself included, watches Antiques Roadshow. You know, "you shouldn't have cleaned it"...
Repairing it was the right thing to do.

Tom



 Posted: Fri Apr 21st, 2017 10:51 pm
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CZL
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I have done a lot of repair, and as much cleaning. When I was done they looked like the day they were made, with another 70 to 80 years life When I started on some of them they bairly let in day light, but did lit in wind, rain, snow, and in one case a family bats. So you can tell the expetrts on the road show for me. I left um better then I found um. Got paid for it in ththe bargain. CZ

Charles Z Lawrence
CZLawrence Stained Glass
http://www.charleszlawrence.com



 Posted: Wed May 31st, 2017 09:26 pm
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MikeD
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Thanks for your replies. I had trouble wrapping my head around the fact that the 100 year old window with previous repairs where the waterproofing putty was still smeared on the exterior of the glass would lose value due to our repairs. I haven't had a chance to try to get new photos. We had another hail storm come through two weeks ago. One church had 56 tennis ball size holes in their windows. Fortunately they were not painted.



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