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Glassmasters Screen Printing Medium
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 Posted: Thu Nov 27th, 2014 08:44 am
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Don Burt
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Is anyone formerly associated with GlassMasters (sp?) also a reader of this bulletin board? My understanding is that Glass Masters created their transparent reproductions by layered screen printing. And that they did it without multiple firings. I also heard that John Nussbaum (always referred to as JOHN NUSSBAUM reverently by Dick) passed away earlier this year or late last year. At any rate, I continue to be obsessed by transparent enamels and I've been speculating about some applications using a drying medium that could be layered. Does anyone know the medium that JOHN NUSSBAUM used for his screen process, and did they actually dry the piece before the next application? I'd ask Reusche, but I don't know if the Glass Masters company still exists or may again start up, and it may be poor form for them to discuss their relationship. Thanks in advance....DB



 Posted: Fri Nov 28th, 2014 03:10 pm
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Vic
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I worked in their retail store not in the "factory". They used some type of oil. They put paint and oil in a cylindrical glass jar and placed the jar on a commercial hot dog cooker. The one that has rollers that heat up. They continually rolled the paint jar at low heat to keep the paint in suspension. After they screened one color the glass (many pieces at a time) was placed in a "bakery rack" that they attached box fans to on one side. The fans blow dried the paint. When dry, the glass went to the next screen station. All their piece where fired once in a "lear" kiln with a few different heating areas. The paints were mixed with "stuff" maybe called ice or flux (I don't remember) to alter the firing temperatures to help achieve the one time fire. John worked with Frank Reusche to figure it all out.

Maybe try contacting this person
http://www.jeanhclarkmonoprints.com/

Last edited on Fri Nov 28th, 2014 03:24 pm by Vic



 Posted: Sat Nov 29th, 2014 08:38 am
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Don Burt
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Thanks Vic. Interesting stuff. Bet they put japan drier in their squeegee oil



 Posted: Sun Nov 30th, 2014 12:53 am
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gwsg
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11 screens, 1 firing, no japan driers

Attached Image (viewed 244 times):

IMG_2327.jpg



 Posted: Sun Nov 30th, 2014 12:54 am
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gwsg
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colour over colour

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IMG_2326.jpg



 Posted: Sun Nov 30th, 2014 12:42 pm
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Vic
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You pulled 11 screens on 1 piece of glass? which ones?

Glassmasters Guild did a copy of this Lafarge fish for the Boston Museum. As I recall there were over 25 screens used in 1 fire

Attached Image (viewed 241 times):

$_57.jpg

Last edited on Sun Nov 30th, 2014 01:12 pm by Vic



 Posted: Sun Nov 30th, 2014 03:20 pm
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gwsg
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everything inside the purple border is one piece of glass



 Posted: Mon Dec 1st, 2014 10:10 am
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Tod
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Paint on only one side?



 Posted: Mon Dec 1st, 2014 02:23 pm
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gwsg
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Paint on front, enamel on back



 Posted: Sun Apr 12th, 2015 04:20 pm
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bklyn
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I worked for Glassmasters in 1976, I was at a screening station all day. They gave us rubber mats to stand on, and would wheel the bakers' trays with a new batch of roundels over as they dried. The most difficult part (besides getting sore legs) was that the new screen had to be aligned exactly over the previous one, so that the final image was clear, but after many hours it became almost automatic. It was a cheerful place to work, I remember the Asian man across from me, named Wiley I think, had a Walkman which I found amazing. At Christmas time, they let us go through the rejects boxes and take pieces that weren't perfect. We also found some of the vintage screens that we used to make holiday cards, some of which I still have. As for the answer to the original question, I'm afraid I don't have any technical details. I know the pieces I kept are painted on the front and glass on the back side. (See attached). I was eventually offered a promotion to the firing department to work with Liz, but alas I left town for a stained glass job in Minneapolis.

Attached Image (viewed 182 times):

IMG_4990.jpg



 Posted: Mon Apr 13th, 2015 10:53 am
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Krueger
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Don, here is web site for Vicky Millard....she would probably know.

http://victoriamillard.com/

Barbara Krueger



 Posted: Sun Jul 3rd, 2016 02:04 pm
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dcs-ny
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I worked in their retail store, on 6th ave, in the 70's. I know that Bernie Harris, one of the owners, with john Nussbaum, of glass masters is still alive, living in NYC. if still interested in the process perhaps contacting him would be the way to go.



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