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How are door sidelights installed?
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 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2011 12:29 pm
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Don Burt
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People in modern homes with front door sidelights sometimes get the idea that stained glass would be just the thing to have there. What are their best options in terms of installation technique?  Is there a most common or most practical technique?  I'm envisioning answers containing words like 'sandwich', 'tempered', 'IG Unit'. Actually, maybe I'm not looking for the most common technique, but rather the most practical and cost effective. Thanks in advance for any opinions.   



 Posted: Tue Mar 29th, 2011 01:08 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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The most practical and cost effective way is usually to install the stained glass on the inside of the unit, into the sight-size opening, and place new stops around to hold it in.   This works if the original stops are flat.

Best, Mary



 Posted: Wed Mar 30th, 2011 11:42 pm
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Steve
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Practical and cost effective?  Hmmm opens a few questions. and some about the people in the house.

If the house has children, or grandchildren that are young, there is no way I would install a leaded unit exposed, regardless of what BOCA says about decorative glass and exmeptions.  I have to sleep at night.

 

I install a great many sidelites each year, and I became involved in leaded glass thanks to the late 70's surge of insulated glass with decorative glass inserts in thermal insulated modern doors, both steel and fiberglass.

Every single one of them were insulated with safety glass, usually 1/8 tempered.

WHile not the perfect method, I must consider the client, and liability. 

I should mention that I have had one call back regarding this method, a broken seal, and it was 15 years after installation, they just wanted it fixed.

 

I should mention, I am in Michigan, where nearly every entry and other glass panels in the house are thermal units due to the climate.  If I were to put a leaded unit in front of the interior side of a thermal unit, without a gap of some kind, there will be a problem with condensation between, not always, but often.

Last edited on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 09:25 pm by Steve



 Posted: Thu Mar 31st, 2011 01:27 am
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troymoody
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as the father of a 2 year old, i have zero reservations installing "exposed" leaded panels in any home. in my neck of the woods.... the technique as described by Mary of installing art glass panels up against the interior side of an existing insulated unit is by far the most common, certainly the easiest and i would say the most practical.

cheers'
troy moody
http://www.troymoody.com
tempe az



 Posted: Thu Mar 31st, 2011 09:57 am
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artfem
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One caveat to Troy's posting, installing a leaded glass panel in contact wit the interior surface of an insulated unit can often void the warranty of the insulated unit because it may lead to early failure of the unit's seal. It is up to the individual if you want to say this to a client, but I do think you should be aware of the fact.

 



 Posted: Fri Apr 1st, 2011 01:52 am
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glassgal
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I had some sidelights that I made for a client that were made without the insulated panels . The client had there own carpenter install. One year later I got a call because some children in the household were fighting and an elbow went through the sidelight. Lesson learned- the parent made the child pay for the repair. Never heard if the child was hurt - Moral of the story - the home was a doctors's home and he did not want to pay for the added protection. I wonder if he would if he did it all over again?



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