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packing and shipping
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 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 12:14 pm
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Ardbeg
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Anyone like to discuss this topic?......



 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 12:22 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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Sure, what's the issue? M



 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 12:56 pm
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Ardbeg
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I'm just considering various methods / materials for shipping large windows using a courier firm - ie, not in my wagon, so how best to eliminate ANY possibility of breakage. Any tip, or hints, or tried and tested ideas would be interesting to read.



 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 06:04 pm
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Steve
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What is considered large?  Are they in some kind of sash frame or trabeling framework.  Courier? as in freight shipper?  can you crate it and A-frame it to a pallet?  How many?  How far are they going?



 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 07:12 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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Hi Linda,

When I've been sent windows from museums they always build strong crates and ship by a fine-arts shipper.  So when I need to send panels I do the same.  I build a wooden crate, put a firm cushion on all sides on the interior, make a package of each piece of glass by sandwiching it between cardboard or foamcore. Put all the packages in, making sure they cannot move - up or sideways - and close it up.   I know some ship by UPS or FEDEX, but you really have to pack it well then, because it may take a beating - be dropped, have other boxes on top of it, etc.   Some never want to ship by air because there is so much on and off various vehicles along the way.  With a fine-arts shipper using a truck that is reduced and you have people who are used to carrying fragile objects handling yours. 

Best, Mary



 Posted: Sat Dec 3rd, 2011 08:11 pm
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artfem
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Linda: Long time no see, hope you are well. In my opinion, the packing and shipping of glass items is very product specific. It is difficult to give definitive advice without knowing the following: the size of the panels, the method of support, seeing a photo of the panele, are there pieces at great risk or are all of the pieces within the panel of a reasonable design for travel, and other issues.

Working with the Smithsonian Institution and the the Met, I have designed crates for the shipping of many windows and objects all around the world. If you check with museum personnel, I think you will find that the consensus opinion is to ship stained glass in a Crate within a crate. The interior crate is designed to receive the panel. It is supported with a combination of soft foam in close proximity to the panel, and more rigid foam filling the balance of the inner crate.

The inner crate is then supported on blocks of a medium to firm foam within the exterior crate. I used this method to ship 90 pieces of Tiffany art to Japan and to museums throughout the USA. If you think I can be helpful to you, please send me more information and I will be glad to offer you my opinion. I have shipped with common carriers, but I agree with Mary's suggestion to use a fine art mover. Regardless, you want to make sure you have all-risk insurance in place to cover any possible loss.

Best,
Art



 Posted: Sun Dec 4th, 2011 05:03 am
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Ardbeg
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Thanks Art and Mary,

The "box within a box" is how I would go about it myself, and ensure that the exterior box CANNOT be damaged / fall over / can cope with other boxes "accidentally" being placed on top / couriers who can't read "this way up" and "fragile glass" signs etc. Packing with innert materials such as Plastizote. to keep the inner box tight, and for there to be a little give if the outer box gets knocked. I like the "A" frame idea for the inner box - but I guess that only works if the outer box is kept upright..... my old grey cells are working....

Linda



 Posted: Sun Dec 4th, 2011 04:18 pm
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Vic
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However you crate it. Do NOT put the foam rubber directly on the glass. It may stick. I use acid free paper as a barrier



 Posted: Sun Dec 4th, 2011 07:22 pm
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Tod
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To keep the box upright with the "A-frame" method, you'd attach it to a pallet with diagonal bracing (the A-frame). That effectively prevents carriers from putting stuff on top and it will not be possible to lay it down and stack stuff on it.

You're right to consider making it impenetrable - some fool may ram it with a forklift, deliberately or not. I suggest plywood but there may be other, cooler solutions these days. In the long run, I think the best we can do is "idiot-resistant", 'cause "fool-proof" is an impossibility! - T



 Posted: Mon Dec 5th, 2011 10:50 pm
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bkessler
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Funny (now!) Crate Story:

Some years back we had a project where we needed a special-order, full case of Spectrum Glass.  It was coming directly from the factory and after a l-o-n-g wait, we began to wonder what had become of it.  Using the Pro Number, we called the shipper and they said they had no record of it arriving at the terminal (we were scheduled to pick it up there).  After a couple more days, they finally called us and said we could come and get the crate, but there "might be a problem."

When I arrived at the terminal, I found the crate sitting without a skid, no A-frame, nothing but the three-foot high, one foot wide and five foot long crate.  Full of completely shattered glass.  Spectrum had a shock indicator on the side, which showed red!  Apparently someone had knocked the crate over in the terminal and hid it away until my inquiries sniffed it out!

I had to refuse the shipment and urged Spectrum to properly A-frame the next crate (which they did).  Beware the man behind the forklift!



 Posted: Tue Dec 6th, 2011 11:56 am
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Kal Tiki
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This photo should allow you the 1000 words. From Chicago Art Glass when they were still making sheet glass.

Attached Image (viewed 249 times):

Ace Ventura Package.jpg



 Posted: Tue Dec 6th, 2011 12:48 pm
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Ardbeg
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...smashing...



 Posted: Tue Dec 6th, 2011 07:51 pm
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Vic
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Ardbeg wrote: ...smashing...
You could pre-smash your glass before shipping. That way you don't have to worry what the shipper may do



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