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cutting glass technique
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 Posted: Tue Jun 11th, 2013 06:44 pm
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Krueger
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Just saw a video of a well known stained glass practioner demonstrating cutting glass.....he was pulling the cutter towards him......personally I push away from my body and that is how I teach.....the weight of your body is working "with" the arm, while pulling the cutter towards the body doesn't demonstrate good "science". What is the general feeling on this matter, and why.....thanks.

Barbara Krueger, Michigan



 Posted: Tue Jun 11th, 2013 06:48 pm
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Rebecca
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I tell my students it doesn't matter whether they push or pull; to do what works best for them.

Rebecca



 Posted: Tue Jun 11th, 2013 07:23 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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I can cut a lot faster when pulling the cutter, but use both as necessary.  Best, Mary



 Posted: Tue Jun 11th, 2013 08:54 pm
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Krueger
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I am wondering if the height of the person and/or the height of the table might make it easier to cut by pushing away, or pulling towards oneself?



 Posted: Thu Jun 13th, 2013 11:53 am
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jjkrol
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I too agree that pushing is more accurate.  I grew up using the pull method and converted to pushing later in life.

The main advantage I remember of pulling is when dealing with textured glass or any imperfection on the surface of the glass.  Especially if you hold the cutter in the traditional style between your fingers.  If you have ever rolled a two wheeled cart, you know the load is constant, but it is harder to push than to pull, especially when going over any kind of bump.  There is a higher probability of having to lift the cutter when falling into a pit in the glass when pushing, but rarely necessary when pulling.

I started pushing when the pistol grip came into being.  I found it a lot easier to exert the constant pressure and enjoyed the control and accuracy I gained.



 Posted: Thu Jun 13th, 2013 07:04 pm
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Vic
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I push for shape cutting. Pull for straight line cutting. I've seen many good glass cutters that hold the cutters different ways,push or pull. All that matters is the results that you get.



 Posted: Wed Jun 19th, 2013 01:52 pm
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Tod
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I seem to follow the herd here. I wonder if the method of pattern-cutting changes the way we use the cutter?

If you generally do "trace cutting" is your usual technique different than when you use a template, for example? I know that you can feel the edge of a pattern with the wheel, so whether you push or pull might change.

Last edited on Wed Jun 19th, 2013 01:52 pm by Tod



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