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Cutting glass technique
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 Posted: Tue Jul 31st, 2018 08:32 pm
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Krueger
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Something caught my attention in watching some of the videos that were recently posted........cutting glass....

towards the person, or..... away from the cutter/person......many years ago my engineer husband showed me the weight of the hand/arm pushing AWAY from the cutter has much more "impact" on the glass.......has to do with physics..........so that is how I taught...comments?? 

Barbara in Michigan



 Posted: Tue Jul 31st, 2018 10:15 pm
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David Crane
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I learned to pull the wheel towards me, following a paper pattern. I am mystified how UK people cut on a light box over a cutline, sometimes pushing instead of pulling, and get accurate results. Pushing away, as the engineer states may work best for people with some physical compromises like arthritis or carpel tunnel but "extra" impact on the glass is not always necessary. Just wears out your wheel sooner. The "right" amount of impact depending on the glass is what makes a successful cut in my experience.

By the way, It occurred to me during the AGG in Cleveland recently how we are all members of different "tribes" with different cultures and bylaws but all directed towards the same results (sort of) and with different points of view depending on which "tribe" we joined up with (or were abducted by) at the beginning of our journey.



 Posted: Tue Jul 31st, 2018 11:52 pm
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Tod
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I push for pretty much all pattern cutting: "trace cutting" on the light box, cuttnig around templates or following marker lines on the glass.

I pull for pretty much all cuts using a straight edge.

Then, there are some exceptions.... ;- }
Wondering what tribe I belong to, tho, David.

Last edited on Tue Jul 31st, 2018 11:57 pm by Tod



 Posted: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018 04:38 pm
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Mary Clerkin Higgins
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I pull for speedier cutting and push if necessary for accuracy, but, as David says, more pressure is not always a good thing.



 Posted: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018 06:23 pm
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Krueger
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A while back I watched someone pulling the glass cutter toward their body, and he/she kept moving/swiveling their head to have a good look at what was happening...that seemed awkward ....when pushing, you can see where you are going cause it is always in front of you.,,,so I suggested he/she try pushing .....I guess it is what you get used to.....and David, which "Tribe" do you belong to????



 Posted: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018 06:33 pm
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Melanos
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I cut with a diamond cutter, same one since 1976...
Following a pattern is easy and very precise, whatever stick out can be 'grozed', never use grinder, hate those, do not have one.
My diamond 'sings' as a nightingale, scoring the glass... if it sounds like a grinding sound, it scratches the glass but not separation possible. So I pull the diamond towards me and I am quite fast...
Love to cut glass.



 Posted: Thu Aug 2nd, 2018 07:05 pm
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David Crane
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The technique when cutting with a paper pattern is to pinch the pattern to the glass with thumb and forefinger hold it over the edge of the bench and turn the glass and pattern as necessary. No moving or swiveling of the head necessary.

Glass tribes have no names that I know of. Maybe a better term would be geneology or priesthood. The persons who taught you your craft were in turn taught by predecessors and so on. Unfortunately you get all the bad habits handed down over the years along with the good stuff..... If you are an autodidact it could even be worse. It took me years to figure out I didn't have to wear those awful latex gloves that make your hands sweat while cementing and instead wear painters cotton gloves which keeps the cement off and lets your hands breathe.



 Posted: Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 01:13 pm
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John Emery
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We have always "pushed" our glass cutter away from us here at Preston Studios (rather than pulling it). But there is yet a twist to this, in that Jerry Preston has always modified the handle of a garden tool to put his cutter into.  This is something we have been quite accustomed to and makes it very comfortable (in the hand) to be able to cut at times many many pieces of glass in a single day (Jerry thinks his record was over 200).

Attached Image (viewed 71 times):

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 Posted: Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 01:17 pm
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John Emery
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At Preston Studios we also always keep our cutters in a jar with a sponge at the bottom filled with oil.  Often pliers also wander in, but it keeps everything "ready to go at all times" and seems to help the cutting edges last a bit longer.

Attached Image (viewed 71 times):

20180803_075841.jpg



 Posted: Tue Aug 7th, 2018 03:37 pm
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Rebecca
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John, can you take a picture of how you hold your modified cutter? It looks like it could be good for someone with hand problems, arthritis or muscle weakness.

Rebecca



 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2018 12:34 am
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John Emery
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Jerry Preston is the only glass cutter I have ever known who prefers to SIT down and cut glass.  He sits at his cutting station listening to PBS classical music radio and holds his cutter like this:

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 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2018 12:38 am
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John Emery
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I, on the other hand, prefer to stand normally at my station and cut glass.  I sort of hold Jerry's custom glass cutter the same way, but I also like to add pressure with my pointing finger to be sure I get an even score all along the line.  I often will lay out a great deal of glass and do the initial separating, while Jerry does the final cuts (although I have done ever more finish detail cutting by myself as the years have gone by):

Attached Image (viewed 61 times):

20180807_192530.jpg



 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2018 11:05 pm
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Rebecca
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Thank you for the pictures. Very interesting!

Rebecca



 Posted: Sun Aug 12th, 2018 07:59 pm
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Krueger
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cutters kept in a jar with oil.....some years ago I found that it was very difficult to clean glass cut this way, if one was doing copper foil work.....so, I tried something else......I keep paint thinner in my jar....seems to keep the cutter axle "moist" and then doesn't leave oil residue on the glass.....only do this when I am working for several days/a week......when taking a break, just leave the cutters "bare"/dry until next job comes along.

Barbara in Michigan



 Posted: Sun Aug 12th, 2018 09:10 pm
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John Emery
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Michigan, yes...makes sense. But here on the coast of Florida everything RUSTS...LOL....;-))))



 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2018 08:06 pm
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Krueger
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newest issue of Old House Journal has a one page article about "cutting glass"......their main recommendation is to have the glass very clean, and the diagrams seem to indicate they are cutting "away".....but they don't say that specifically.

Barbara in Michigan



 Posted: Mon Aug 13th, 2018 08:27 pm
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John Emery
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A lot has to do with exactly how you pattern your glass as well. At Preston Studios we sketch on white paper (a roll of butcher block paper, essentially). Then using carbon paper we trace that onto what appears to be manila folder type material (it comes in large sheets). We separate the pattern pieces using an exacto-style of knife, but it has two blades inserted. This allows for the thickness of the copper foil and removes a very tiny bit. Using these patterns we trace onto the glass using black Sharpie markers. If the glass is very dark we also have markers that have quick drying white ink we get from our local art supply store. With the glass so marked we score just inside the lines. This means normally just a modicum of grinding on each piece and the window does not "grow" as glass is put into place over the original sketch.



 Posted: Tue Aug 14th, 2018 09:58 pm
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Vic
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John Emery wrote:
Michigan, yes...makes sense. But here on the coast of Florida everything RUSTS...LOL....;-))))

John what do you do about the rust on knives, pliers etc. This is the first year I've experienced a rust problem. Been very humid in N.Y. the last few months



 Posted: Tue Aug 14th, 2018 10:47 pm
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John Emery
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The wonders of WD40...we spray various bits fairly often and wipe them off with paper towels.  As per the photo above, grozing pliers frequently wander into the same jar that holds our cutters....;-)))

Last edited on Tue Aug 14th, 2018 10:47 pm by John Emery



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