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Liquid Abrasive blasting resist
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 Posted: Wed Feb 26th, 2020 02:41 am
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Don Burt
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I would like to hear what people find satisfactory for hand applied, or screen printing applied, liquid resist for abrasive blasting. I can use silicone from a tube, possibly thinned with alcohol, but silicone will not easily clean-off from the substrate with any solvent. There is a light sensitive liquid called SBX from Anchor, but it is marketed to high volume users who wish to save money over sheet resist products. It is only available in gallons and it's shelf life is limited and unsuitable for one-off experiments like I would do. Latex? PVA products? I've tried latex spray masks for signmakers. It’s great for airbrush mask. But it’s not tenacious or tough enough for even light pressure blasting. I’ve actually tried using the screen printing emulsion I use from Ulano called QTX. It doesn’t resist very well. Which is surprising because it’s difficult to clean off tools and work surfaces once it has cured. But anyway, do you have a favorite?



 Posted: Mon Mar 2nd, 2020 01:17 pm
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MattKolenda
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I've worked with SBX quite a bit and it does seem marketed more towards high volume users and will also require a few special tools and dedicated work areas. There is also a film that works the same, it costs a bit more than the liquid but you can bypass the need to spray and I feel it works better for very fine detail. Either of these will require a dark room, high quality film with your image, a pressure washer, and a UV light source. The liquid also requires a spray gun and special stripper to remove after blasting.

We've also used liquid latex and even spray adhesive to create various textures and patterns. There's not a great way to remove these other than scraping with a wallpaper blade which scratches the glass, so we only use these when the whole piece will be frosted after we get it all off. I've been curious about trying rubber products marketed for dipping tool handles. Seems like these might hold up well but not sure how great they will bond to glass.



 Posted: Mon Mar 2nd, 2020 07:55 pm
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Don Burt
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Thanks for the feedback Matt.



 Posted: Tue Mar 3rd, 2020 02:34 pm
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Vic
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UlshsltOLN4



 Posted: Tue Mar 3rd, 2020 06:52 pm
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Don Burt
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Thanks Vic. That guy in the video understands the problem at least. I'm going to experiment with two layer solutions: an adhesive that is soluble, underneath a resist that is not. For example, coat the substrate with Sodium Silicate and let it dry. Then apply a silicone gel resist via a squeeze bottle and or brush, or an acrylic resist. But will the resist dissolve the NaSiO? Golden makes an acrylic medium additive called GAC 900 that adds flexibility to acrylic paint, intended for people to make their own fabric paint. I'm going to experiment with GAC 900 and the embarrassing number of polymer paints and glues I have on hand in an attempt to make a resist that will stick readily to NaSiO, but not dissolve it. But I'm guessing that silicone in a tube, maybe thinned with alcohol, will work better. Retirement is awesome.

edit: I'm daydreaming about a three part solution now.

Last edited on Tue Mar 3rd, 2020 06:54 pm by Don Burt



 Posted: Wed Mar 25th, 2020 02:14 pm
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Don Burt
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I did the experiment with waterglass and silicone caulk. It worked pretty well. The silicone adhered to the waterglass during blasting and then it all washed off readily in warm water. I will use this.



 Posted: Wed Mar 25th, 2020 02:16 pm
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Don Burt
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Silicone on glass over a layer of dried waterglass

Attached Image (viewed 61 times):

IMG_3556.JPG

Last edited on Wed Mar 25th, 2020 02:19 pm by Don Burt



 Posted: Wed Mar 25th, 2020 02:21 pm
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Don Burt
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After removing the silicone with warm water

Attached Image (viewed 60 times):

IMG_3557.JPG



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