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 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2009 07:38 am
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Erica Rollings
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Does anyone have suggestions about safely transporting flat-glass panels?  I've worked out a good storage system, but its too heavy for transport...



 Posted: Thu Jul 2nd, 2009 12:43 pm
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joseph2bears
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Hi Erica.  It depends on the size.  Small panels (less than 2 or 3 sq ft) can be wrapped in bubble wrap and transported in a cardboard box.  If it is being shipped and handled by gorillas, I would add two sheets of 1/8" plywood and sandwich the bubble wrapped panel between them.

Anything larger should be crated.  The styrofoam insulation board from Home Depot makes a good crate interior and comes in various thicknesses.  It can be carved to fit odd shapes or protruding elements.  I start with the styrofoam and encapsulate the panel with sufficient protection on all sides.  Then I build a box with 2x4's or 2x6's to frame the edges and add 3/8" plywood for front and back sides. 

If it is being shipped motor freight, the crate is mounted upright on a pallet and secured with "A"-frame braces to keep it upright.  Shippers hate this because it reduces the load factor in the truck and it has to go on top.  They want to lay it flat on its face and drop other 3-ton crates on top of it.  They have been known to knock off the A-braces and do this.  And of course the work is destroyed when they do.  Make sure you have insurance and documentation to the fight with the carrier's insurance.  There are many horror stories on the Internet.

If you will be in Buffalo for the conference, find me and I will show you the crate I made for Cosmic Singularity, a 30" round panel with protruding bevels.  The finished crate is 42" x 42" x 5". 

--Joseph 2bears



 Posted: Thu Jul 2nd, 2009 02:18 pm
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Preston Studios - John
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Preston Studios has always used hollow-core doors from Home Depot or Lowes for transporting entrances into place.  This is a light-weight system for transporting anything not more than 36 inches or so wide, although we have also made extensions to these lightweight doors for slightly larger panels.  The nice thing is today you can get these doors in 8.0 sizes, too.

We attach a wider piece of 1 by 4 inch material to one edge. We actually use these doors to construct on, as well.  This means that after soldering one side (we use copper foil technique exclusively on all work) and attaching zinc all around the edges, we simply "tilt" the door up off the work bench.  We then remove the work - turn it around and put it back on the door, "tilt" it back up onto the bench, and solder the back side.

To deliver the works onto the construction site we use these doors, which fit handsomely into a station-wagon or SUV.  No monster truck or delivery vehicle is needed.  These light-weight doors have certainly saved our backs!

If you are speaking of shipping something, that is an entirely different matter....
Hope this helps.

John C Emery, Sr.
http://www.prestonstudios.com
33 years of Artistry in Stained Glass

Chairman of the Board

http://www.igga.org



 Posted: Sat Jul 4th, 2009 06:08 am
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Erica Rollings
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Thank you Joseph, the crate you've made sounds like the ones I receive with my stock sheets.  I needed to be clearer with my inquiry:  I need to find another method to bring my glass with me across town (in a van) or across states... right now, each panel is wrapped in bubble and stored in a vinyl sleeve which hangs from an amazingly sturdy iron rack.  The rack is on casters and so supposedly movable, but the weight (with panels) is immense.  I hope to find a lighter but yet still sturdy arrangement.  Won't be in Buffalo, but look forward to meeting you at the next one!



 Posted: Sat Jul 4th, 2009 06:19 am
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Erica Rollings
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John, Thank you for your response.. I'll have to look into the hollow-core door idea, sounds great.  My workbench surface (for cutting) is sheetrock.  I've found this to be a kind surface for glass with just the right amount of give.  Because of that, I've used leftover sheetrock squares to solder on.  My method is the same as yours, almost exactly, except I sandwich the panel between two sheets of the material to flip it over.  A bit weighty.  However I  usually only need to do this once.  I attach the zinc before the finish bead is done and the panel does not need to be sandwiched anymore to flip it over.  However:  I will certainly look into a door!



 Posted: Sun Jul 5th, 2009 10:03 am
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joseph2bears
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Hi Erica.  Now I understand your problem a little better, since I had the same problem.  My solution was to build a small glass rack that fits and ties down in the bed of the truck. 

I made three "L's" with 2x4's and added another 2x4 across the back at the foot and under the front of the foot to tilt the back of the "L's" at about a 6 degree angle off vertical.  I used 1x3's across the back and spaced them about 8" apart.  I put a 1x4 across the bottom with a 1x2 on edge to make a lip at the front edge of the bottom piece.  The whole thing was put together with drywall screws. 

At the time my mother-in-law had her house recarpeted.  I salvaged strips of carpeting from her trash and lined the back slats and bottom piece by stapeling the carpet strips.  I seated the stapels with a hammer to make sure none protruded up into the carpet pile where they would touch the glass.  Between each of the back slats I put eye bolts with a 1" eye hole.  These eye bolts are the bungee cord attachment points to both hold glass/panels in the rack as well as to tie the rack down in the truck. 

The whole thing is light weight and I can easily lift it in and out of the truck as it is needed.  I have found the rack very useful for picking up glass at the supplier's as well as for transporting finished panels across town.  My rack is 5' in length by 42" high.  You can make it any size to suit your needs. 

--Joseph 2bears



 Posted: Tue Jul 28th, 2009 10:44 pm
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Adam
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Has anyone heard how Joseph and Vicki are doing? Did they make it back to California? How is Vicki feeling? Someone post if they've heard anything.

Thanks,

Adam

 



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