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Scoring wheel down force requirements
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 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2021 01:26 am
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John E
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I am just about finished with my scoring fixture. It cuts straight lines using a controlled downward pressure, varied in .5 lb increments.

While I started stained glass in 1976 (so appear to be hugely experienced), I haven't done stained glass since 1976....

Getting back into the swing of things, I went to purchase cutters only to find that the ones I received had ranges printed on them. 2-6mm, 6-12mm, and 12-20mm. Without any detailed descriptions, I can only assume that means glass thickness.

I examined the three wheels under my stereoscope. It seems like the 12-20mm is a sharper angle, although I admit they are quite similar so I may just be doing the "wishful thinking" thing.

So I have machined an straight cutter setup that I can set the downforce between .5 lbs and 5 lbs, in .5 lb increments.

As the ink hasn't even dried yet, the only thing I can report is that the 12-20mm cutter unlubricated requires more than 4 lbs force to scribe, 5 worked... As I move on, I will perform more tests to see if I can detect a difference between the three size range scoring wheels.

Eventually, I will purchase a serrated scoring wheel and a "tap" wheel, to see if they provide different down force requirements.

So far, my experiments will be using simple float glass from home depot, standard window stuff.. Eventually I will consume some cathedral once I have established the test regimen.

I hope others decide to engage this thread, I welcome input. My other postings seem to be of little interest to anyone to respond, I am hoping this might be different..



John



 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2021 04:20 pm
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Krueger
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It seems to me you are making a mountain out of a molehill........don't think your research will make any difference to someone active in stained glass......other comments welcome..

Barbara, Michigan Stained Glass Census



 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2021 09:16 pm
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John E
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I've heard from some who are active in stained glass mention long term hand issues due to cutting force needs. Kind of like carpal tunnel, but different.

If I find that a specific wheel type reduces the force required, that may be of interest to them, worth the extra cost.

If it makes no difference, that is also a data point.

John



 Posted: Fri Aug 6th, 2021 04:38 pm
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Susana Rutherford
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I think from the prospective of long term health it’s interesting to have this research. I prefer the pistol grip cutter for ergonomic reasons.



 Posted: Fri Aug 6th, 2021 09:22 pm
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John E
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Given that I just joined, I am just learning about this forum.

My fear is that it is rarely visited, or, it has fallen into the pattern of "it's all known, so don't bother trying anything new."

Your post is very comforting. Thank you.

I am thinking about new tech. It may be possible to reduce the down force to amazingly small levels, I have a lot of stock items in my basement I can play with. At some point, should my thinking be on the money, I will have a demo unit I will send to someone in the business I trust, she will have time to evaluate it.

John



 Posted: Sun Aug 8th, 2021 04:50 pm
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Rebecca
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I have heard of teachers putting a piece of glass on a scale and showing students how much pressure they are putting on the glass. I'm sure your set up is more accurate. We want people to learn about stained glass. Having a good way to show them about the pressure needed to cut glass is a good start. All knowledge is good.



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