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Flourescent tubes
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 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 05:09 pm
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Krueger
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It seems to me I have heard about a certain type of flourescent tube which should be used with stained glass.  I would like to pass this information on to someone about to make an interior wall installation.  Thanks.

Barbara in Michigan



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 08:02 pm
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Hallie Monroe
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I believe at last years conference there was a lecture on artificial lighting for Stained glass. They seemed confident that there is no heat build up or hot spots, and the life expectancy was far greater then traditional florescent fixtures. I'm sure it wont come cheep. I'm sorry I don't remember the company name.
I know that in my studio I have a combination of warm and cool tubes to give an equal balance. If only bathing suit stores did the same..........
Good luck.



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 10:46 pm
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Vic
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Krueger wrote: It seems to me I have heard about a certain type of flourescent tube which should be used with stained glass.  I would like to pass this information on to someone about to make an interior wall installation.  Thanks.

Barbara in Michigan

daylight corrected



 Posted: Sat Apr 12th, 2008 01:51 am
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bkessler
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I am sure that one can take the search for the perfect backlighting source too far, but here's one way to do it:  In the film/TV industry there are true-daylight-colored, full-spectrum flourescent tubes available.  Used when shooting film (anyone remember doing that??), they allow the lighting to match the film stock; otherwise flourescent tubes leave a green cast on the film.  KinoFlo company is one manufacturer.  There are others.

This does not apply, of course, to the human eye so one can simply use a variety of cool-white tubes to your liking.  The key is to explain to the owner that the tubes should be replaced all at once with EXACTLY the same type to avoid mis-matched colors.

As for hot-spots, I would think it simpler to put a layer of white plexiglas between the lamps and the window.  We have done this several times with great success, using #2447 (which is a type with a fairly low color density).



 Posted: Sat May 3rd, 2008 06:51 pm
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Glass Flagg
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You may want to look in to neon lighting. The light output of a tube labeled 6500. It produces the same light output as the sun. The life span of neon is much greater then flourescent lighting. The neon can be shaped to fit any shape.



 Posted: Sat May 3rd, 2008 08:37 pm
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Vic
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Glass Flagg wrote: You may want to look in to neon lighting. The light output of a tube labeled 6500. It produces the same light output as the sun. The life span of neon is much greater then flourescent lighting. The neon can be shaped to fit any shape.
You load the tubing with different gas to get different light spectrums. "Neon" light can be a general term or one that means the tube is loaded with neon gas. Argon gas is what is needed to look like daylight



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