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Rona
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For the conference in Pittsburgh next year, I have asked an architect to give a talk. She wants to know what WE want to know and what we would like to get from her talk. Vic has suggested we should ask architects how they work; what they expect from the stained glass people bidding on jobs; what they look for in a stained glass studio; how to read their specs/drawings; mainly focusing on a "business'" type of talk.
Anything else people would like?
She works mainly on new build so conservation questions won't be much use.
Added bonus: she trained in a stained glass studio for a year so she knows a fair bit about stained glass.

Mary Clerkin Higgins
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How do architects find the artists that will work in their buildings?  Is there anything we could do to (having an online directory of work?) that could help them find people they may not know about?  What's their system presently? M

Rona
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We touched briefly on this when chatting, and she said she wants to explain that "the architect doesn't always bring the artist to the table". She's going to speak to a couple of other architects she knows to see if she can use any case studies.

I think it's a really important one - BSMGP have a sort of online directory of their chosen artists but none of the architects I knew in Britain were aware of it.

Maybe we don't get something online and try to get them to go to it, maybe we see if we can infiltrate THEIR websites? Will put it on the list of things to suggest she talks about. Thanks!

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Rona wrote: For the conference in Pittsburgh next year, I have asked an architect to give a talk. She wants to know what WE want to know and what we would like to get from her talk. Vic has suggested we should ask architects how they work; what they expect from the stained glass people bidding on jobs; what they look for in a stained glass studio; how to read their specs/drawings; mainly focusing on a "business'" type of talk.
Anything else people would like?
She works mainly on new build so conservation questions won't be much use.
Added bonus: she trained in a stained glass studio for a year so she knows a fair bit about stained glass.


I forgot to add

Do architects need to take an IQ test prior to getting a certificate? And if so, what is the minimal requirement?

Rona
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You know, given that she thinks I'm pretty dim (though I have a nice accent), I'm not sure that question would go down so well from me. However, I'll try asking her when I speak to her when she and her husband get back from Stockholm where they're going for the Nobel awards. (Like Fizz, he's a spectroscopist, but I don't see Fizz getting the Nobel prize for physics any time soon...)

Last edited on Wed Oct 19th, 2011 04:56 pm by Rona

Vic
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Rona wrote: You know, given that she thinks I'm pretty dim (though I have a nice accent), I'm not sure that question would go down so well from me. However, I'll try asking her when I speak to her when she and her husband get back from Stockholm where they're going for the Nobel awards. (Like Fizz, he's a spectroscopist, but I don't see Fizz getting the Nobel prize for physics any time soon...)
I don't know why, but I thought Fizz was a Methodist

Rona
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"I don't know why, but I thought Fizz was a Methodist"
I don't know why, but I thought you'd say "You? Dim? Never!"


Actually, I'm lying. I never thought for a second you'd say that.

Probably thought Fizz was a Methodist becuase he's plainly not a Wee Free.

David Crane
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Rona,

Congratulations on finding an architect sympathetic with stained glass.
In my time I have found only one or two who were knowledgeable and passionate about the medium and even then they had to do somersaults and hand stands in order to keep their clients interested and justify the cost.

Usually what happens, even after you get your foot in the door of an architectural office, you get shunted off to the interior design department where the main focus is carpet, upholstery, and wall and window treatment color and effects. Sometimes the interior designer even has a "vision" about the "space" which makes it all even weirder and complicated.

This is not the world of Ralph Adams Cram or even Robert Sowers.

Sorry to be so negative.

My mood lately has not been good in regards to the future of stained glass.

Who really needs it?.

I'm open to suggestions from spectroscopists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Quakers, architects, and Victor Rothman.

Rona
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Last big job I had, the architect sent all the folk with paint swatches and carpet samples and silk bits down to my studio to try against my glass so they'd all harmonise. Fun, flattering, hugely time consuming. And then he failed to notice (and therefore inform me) that the builders, bless their little cotton socks, changed the size and proportion of the windows... thanks heavens it was a fairly abstract design so didn't need too much tweaking, but it wasn't as satisfying as the original idea. Exactly the same amount of square feet but proportions hugely altered. I thought architects were supposed to keep an eye on that sort of thing. Mebbe I should mention that to Beth.

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Won't get many commissions from the Wee Free's. For our non-West coast Scottish, American cousins, they're about as likely to commission new stained glass as the Amish, the Taliban, Hezbollah or the Hassids. Ah nothing like a world full of toleration and spectroscopists.

Peace,
Linda

PS, I've been to several SG conferences with architects attached (as speakers) - always very worthwhile, as they bring a very different viewpoint to the whole processs. Good to get out of the stained glass bubble.

Last edited on Thu Oct 20th, 2011 07:01 am by Ardbeg

Kal Tiki
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I wonder if an architect is the right person to ask? Of new projects that go through either architects or interior designers I would say in my experience 90% has come through designers. Many architectural firms also offer design services or work closely with interior design firms but if I had to say where new work projects come from it is way more designers than architects.
 Restoration is the opposite. Most really good restoration projects have a preservation architect and/or a conservation consultant on board. I am not offering this as a spring board to talk about quality of those professionals only mentioning as sources of work and who we can direct our marketing to or tweak our work and services to appeal more to them.

CZL
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A coupla years ago I did a big window in a cemetery in Pittsburg
with Kirk Weaver, Jefferson Memorial, the signing of the Declaration
of Independence. There were around 50 figures, painted, it took over
a year to finish. CZ

CZL
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A coupla years ago I did a big window in a cemetery in Pittsburg
with Kirk Weaver, Jefferson Memorial, the signing of the Declaration
of Independence. There were around 50 figures, painted, it took over
a year to finish. CZ

Rona
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Kal, I think an architect is ONE of the right people to ask - and people have been asking to get a tame one lured in to AGG for years. The big job I mention above came about because, when the congregation were building a new church, he suggested that, instead of transferring the old stained glass to the new church, they commission new and put the old windows in the hall. Someone like that is a useful ally. While interior design people are useful, I have to say that the ones I've met need a huge education to teach them that stained glass is not either FLW pastiche or bevels! (I also think that a lot of sg people need a huge education in designing for churches)
In UK I also had a couple of friendly kitchen designers, an architect specialsing in extensions and an interior designer, but it took me years to build up those contacts. If we can take some shortcuts to getting those relationships for our members, I think it's worthwhile.
I take the point about the restoration folk - someone else made it to me too. I am seeing if I can find someone to present that angle too. Any ideas welcome!

Ellen 1
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What is architect's attitude towards leaded glass their buildings, Would
they use it in a contemporary building?
E.

Rona
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CZ - which cemetery? I'm guessing Allegheny or Homewood? I'd like to get to see it, and mebbe get some pictures - we're collecting stained glass pics in Pittsburgh to put in the next couple of newsletters.
By the way, please don't forget our h! In 1890, President Benjamin Harrison established the U.S. Board on Geographic Names; one of the first codes established by the new Board was that the final 'h' should be dropped from all towns ending in 'burgh.' The citizens of Pittsburgh, considering their town an obvious historical exception to this ruling (having been named by a Scot, the correct spelling was burgh), refused to give in to the Board's ruling and mounted a campaign to keep the traditional spelling. Twenty years later, in 1911, the Board finally relented and restored the 'h' to Pittsburgh.
There are zillions of Pittsburgs in USA - we stand proud
as Pittsburgh.

Kal Tiki
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Agree on the design of new churches and architects planning for stained glass in the building. Was responding more to the full range of work in residences, commercial buildings and churches that stained glass studios could pursue. Although the size of some church jobs is huge the number of jobs and the bulk of work may not be in churches.
I'm just throwing some ideas out as to what type of design professionals can inform us as to how to pursue work.
And in the area of training to do church windows I totally agree but the stronger determining factor is who selects an artist for a commission and why? If a church committee selects a design or artist that might not quite cut the mustard shouldn't we be educating the consumer as well?

Rona
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Something very weird just happened - it deleted my reply to Kal, then reinstated it... after I'd posted a cut-down of my previous response. Hm.
Anyway, yes, I completely agree we need to educate the consumer too. In UK I joined up with the local diocese to offer a day of educating folk about glass and it ended up being a mix of "how do I look after my windows", and "how do I tell who made it and therefore what it's worth and therefore how much to insure it for".
In Scotland, at least Church of Scotland, the education effort has been aimed at the committee who approve designs and who hold a list of artists they think acceptable.
Maybe we could get our marketing boffins to infiltrate Interior Design magazines?

Last edited on Thu Oct 20th, 2011 01:20 pm by Rona

Rona
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Ellen - I think that's an important one. A lot of architects seem to shying away from the whole use of lead, not just because they think it's not modern (need some education) but because it's dangerous (need some education).

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Rona wrote: Ellen - I think that's an important one. A lot of architects seem to shying away from the whole use of lead, not just because they think it's not modern (need some education) but because it's dangerous (need some education).

Here is a link to a L.A.Times story about the future of lead

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-lead-disneyland-20111018,0,1686724.story?track=rss

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Jefferson Memorial Cemetery,
Signing of the U.S. Constitution,
is the subject, it is in the Mausoleum
Chapel. It is 27 by 16 feet and it took
about a year to paint and pick the color.
My daughter Tracy helped paint it and keep
track of where we were on the painting. It
is kinda big for my 15 by forty foot studio.
I was one hellofa lot of painting, if Tracy
had not helped I would still be painting.
We started it in late 1996, and installed it
in `1998 I think. Kirk could give you a better
time line on it that. I also spent at least
a year, one week in Pittsburg or at least it
seemed like a year. That time was spent at
his father and grand father's studio, which
he is now running I think. CZ

Rona
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I assumed the window was the Jefferson Memorial, not the cemetery - I'll have to search that one out (not been here long enough yet). Sounds like quite some project!
Apparently it's about 20 miles from me so that should be an interesting jaunt.

Kelley M.
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Rona, What is the name of your book that you had at the conference? I am interested in a purchase.
Thanks,

Kelley Mooers

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I look forward to this discussion in Pittsburgh.

For many, many years my moms church in California have been saving and planning for a new church. First they built a gym/multipurpose room and have had Mass in it for well over 10 years. They are finally finalizing the plans with the architect. He has very definite ideas, The priest thinks highly of him for his status and name, the church committee feel they are constantly bumping their heads with him. They want beauty and 4 stained glass windows of the life of St. Thomas More. The architect wants concrete boxes on boxes. To warm things up a little he has added wood siding to some areas.

They finally got an interior design person to work with the architect.

Three months ago they found out the SG windows were no longer in the project, but they could have some nice carved wood columns so things would not be so boxy. This has been a VERY frustrating process for the parishioners.

The obvious answer is fire the priest who insists on the same architect who built the cement block gym in the first place.

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The Disney article, hmmmmmmm. I am not worried about the occasional kid, but what about the cleaning staff. Is there something that can be applied to seal lead.

Rona
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Kelley, do you mean the church symbolism book?
Judy, I wouldn't be worried about the cleaning staff either - lead isn't half so much a problem for adults, and sensible precautions will cover that. What I'm more worried about is the demonisation of lead.

Judy K
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I agree. One more Industry driven into the ground by fear not reality.


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